The View from a Small Island: Surviving 2020–part II

“Covid 19 Survival is putting a lid on how you feel” (a seven-minute read) Last week I zoom’ed with my 21-year-old granddaughter gathering her observations of 2020. How she approached and survived the Pandemic during her third year at university. What she learned is proof we could live through this unsettling pandemic in unusual ways … Continue reading The View from a Small Island: Surviving 2020–part II

The View from a Small Island: A Year Like No Other

(a five-minute read) What we learned—the Pandemic, Isolation, and Politics impacted our Mental Health—some good news! I avoided posting to my blog since January 6, 2021—I am angry at those who would break our democracy for personal gain. With anger comes loss of creativity, loss of cognitive clarity and most debilitating, loss of humor! I … Continue reading The View from a Small Island: A Year Like No Other

Diversity ‘on the outs’?

That was the week that was* . . . diversity and diversity training were thrown out with the cat... by the White House and at least within federal government organizations. https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/executive-order-combating-race-sex-stereotyping/?utm_source=link The White House rationale is a spin which sees the 'black & white' of an argument and not the gray (context) which surrounds it--simplicity … Continue reading Diversity ‘on the outs’?

The View from a small island: Pandemic of Fear. Stress, Snake-oil or Counseling

“Pandemic data are like the light of distant stars, recording past events instead of present ones.’                                                 Ed Yong, The Atlantic, September 9, 2020 Coping, accusations, impatience, to mask or not to mask, bleach remedy, Princess Bride and a certified young man at 51.  I am reminded this week I have a hot temper—like an … Continue reading The View from a small island: Pandemic of Fear. Stress, Snake-oil or Counseling

A question in the courtroom

The article in Sydney Morning Herald is a good example of why research must be considered thoughtfully before we take it at face value. I have not read the initial research, but Amelia Loughland hopefully clarified to readers that her sampling was small and the results probably not statistically meaningful. Too often the press sees … Continue reading A question in the courtroom